Financial Freedom

Friends, I have a confession.

Ever since my eighteenth birthday, I have had a credit card balance.  I am ashamed!  For eight years, I have carried a balance.  Some months it has been a low balance; the majority of them have carried a larger balance.

It’s sickening to think how much money has been spent on interest alone.  When I first signed up for the credit card, I intended to buy something just so I could pay it off and start building credit.  But one thing always leads to another and… what started as a good way to build credit became the bane of my existence.  If I’m counting correctly, it’s been 96 months of constant credit card payments.

Well, friends.  Not any more.

It’s taken a little fancy footwork with my finances, but at long last I have paid off my credit card bill.  Now, my only debt consists of student loans (and frankly, I’m proud of those).

I wish I could give you a more substantial reflection here on the nature of financial servitude and the all-too-common spiraling destruction of personal finances, but I think it’s enough to simply proclaim my freedom from the credit card.  Freedom.  It feels good.

Am I cutting up my plastic?  No.  I’m too much of a pragmatist.  Should any major expense come up, my checking account just isn’t equipped to handle it. So I’ll keep that credit card in case of emergency (now with the knowledge that “wanting a new computer” does not equal “emergency”).

Instead, when I open up my wallet and I see that little sliver of plastic shining back at me, I will breathe a sigh of relief.

After 96 months, I don’t have a credit card payment anymore.

(PS- I forgot to mention that I haven’t put anything new on this credit card in three years.  Three years, people.  That’s a long time to be paying for stuff.)

Advertisements

3 Replies to “Financial Freedom”

  1. Congrats! You definitely should feel good about being out of that downward spiral. When you get a steady full-time income and know you can pay it off in full every month, THEN start using it for the perks.

    As for now, just stick with the debit account :)

    Like

    1. Ah, yes. It should also be added that I have not put anything new on my credit card for the past three years. Yep… three years to pay off five years’ worth of sporadic spending.

      The only real perk from all this is that I’ve managed to get a surprisingly good credit score… apparently they don’t care so much if you don’t pay it off so long as you make regular payments. Ha!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s